e-learning

DevLearn 2009 Recap

(Okay, I admit it… this post is WAY overdue.) Let me begin by saying this is not a rant, but rather an honest account of my impressions regarding this year’s DevLearn. Nearly two months have passed, and when I think of DevLearn I think of two things: Social media gone wild, and hallway conversations. Social Media Gone Wild DevLearn 2009 was absolutely wonderful if you’re into incorporating social media into e-learning. Or should I say “using social media for learning,” without the “e.” Unfortunately for me, I’m not really interested in using social media for learning. I mean, I learn …

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Best Practices in E-Learning

Someone recently posted a blog entry ranting about the use of the term “best practices” in our industry. I understand the frustration with thoughtless pronouncements about best practices, especially coming from people who may not know any better; it will often sound a lot like how like mom used to say “eat this, it’s good for you” without really knowing whether it’s true. However, there is a big difference between best practices in terms of learning theory — something that’s difficult to quantify and/or prove — and technology.

Ideas wanted for new SCORM wrappers

As you may have read in previous posts or tweets, I’m working on a new SCORM 2004 wrapper for both JavaScript and ActionScript that will contain advanced functionality and improved shortcuts. For instance, I’m trying to write an easier way to work with the cmi.interactions model, and also trying to add more error-checking that will look for gotchas such as exceeding the length limit of suspend_data. I’m looking for good ideas. How do you handle your cmi.interactions? What kind of code shortcuts would you like to see? How can working with SCORM be made easier? I’d love to hear your …

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Captivate 4 Variables in PDF Format

Kurt Melander was kind enough to clean up my Captivate 4 variable list and convert it to PDF format for those who’d like to print it out. Get it here. Thanks, Kurt!

SCORM security (two kinds of SCORM people)

I’ve had a flurry of emails and messages regarding my SCORM cheat the past few days, and have received feedback from a number of well-regarded SCORM aficionados, some of whom contributed to the standard and helped make SCORM what it is today. This is wonderful, I’m very happy to hear from everyone, especially regarding such an engaging topic.

But as I hear more from these seasoned SCORM pros, I’ve made (what I believe to be) an interesting observation: there is a sharp division between die-hard SCORM developers and casual users. I suppose I’ve felt this way for a long time, but it’s really coming into focus this week. Let me try to define the camps.

Cheating in SCORM

I’m always surprised how little people talk about cheating in e-learning; maybe it’s a fear of revealing just how easy it can be. The fact is, SCORM — the most common communication standard in e-learning — is fairly easy to hack. I’ve whipped up a proof-of-concept bookmarklet that when clicked will set your SCORM course to complete with a score of 100 (works with both SCORM 1.2 and 2004).

The pipwerks forum is dead, long live the new eLearning Technology and Development Google Group!

I’d like to say thank you to all the people who posted in the pipwerks forum, and invite you to join me in the new eLearning Technology and Development group.

I’d also like to ask anyone and everyone who develops e-learning to drop by and sign up for the eLearning Technology and Development group. Ask questions — lots of questions — and let’s see if we can get a good community going!

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